An Indigenous Perspective – April 20th Growth and Prosperity

 
Today is a well-known annual check-point for cannabis activists, industry players  and, it’s a festival for those who want to know what the buzz is with 4-20. While the origins of this annual cannabis celebration is disputed, one thing is clear, many people across the country are celebrating this green leafy plant, making April 20tha day of significance.
 
 Let’s consider for a moment, a connecting historical conversation from the Indigenous perspective here in what is now referred to as Canada; right back to the early colonial expeditions that landed explorers on to the eastern shores that were seen as unfit and undesirable.
 
On this very same day — April 20 — in 1534, French explorerJacques Cartier set off from Saint-Malo with 2 ships and 61 men. Favoured by “good weather,” he crossed the Atlantic in 20 days.“I did not see one cart-load of earth,” it was “the land God gave to Cain.” On June 15, he steered “towards the south” and entered unexplored regions. He went along the west coast of Newfoundland, distributing French names, and reached what is now called Cabot Strait, but he did not perceive that it was a navigable channel and turned westward.
 
This being the “new world” for early settlers, it was seen as “terra nullius”, empty land that had no human lives, where the Indigenous were seen as savage and without a soul – it was a sign of how visiting colonizers would conduct themselves in subsequent centuries; all leading us to April 20th2019.
 
Today Canada’s legislative agenda and policies are fraught with an insidious racist narrative and modern foundation of colonial arrogance that still does not respect Indigenous Nationhood. All this to say that cannabis laws in Canada are not anywhere near built on mutual interest, considering the rights, jurisdiction and economic interests of First Nations who wish to exercise their inherent and treaty rights separate and autonomous from that of federalist influence.
 
Now that we have the historical context set out, I note that Indigenous Peoples have a 4-20 perspective on cannabis that deserves attention. Our laws, economic rights, trade practices, social perspectives, and responsibilities are virtually unrecognized by the federal government in this country; at least without struggle and assertion. 
 
You see, all of these rights of Nationhood are founded in Sovereignty that has never been relinquished, given away, nor were we conquered by war. As a matter of fact, our warriors were, and continue to be, allies in wartime and peacekeeping duties. The point here is this – Canadians still benefit from the strength and defense obligations of First Nations as Nationhood partners.
 
When we look across the country, we see many hard-fought assertions to participate in Canada’s cannabis industry – but it’s not an easy, cut and dried task to unpack where First Nations stand in today’s industry.  The mishmash of views and approaches to First Nation jurisdictional issues are perceived by Canada is a result of the neglect of not only Canada and the province, but due to the political paralysis of some of our own First Nation leaders on the issue – but that another story for another day.
 
Without getting too far into the weeds – we know that there are three central concerns from Indigenous Peoples regarding Canada’s laws on cannabis:
 
First, respecting the Nationhood rights of Indigenous communities on cannabis means a formal recognition of First Nation industry interests. 
 
Secondly, consultation laws that Canada is bound to, simply were not respected in the accelerated manner that the federal government advanced the legislative agenda. 
 
Finally, Canada’s claims to reconciliation – at least from the economic perspective, are clearly of no significant consequence.
 
First Nations today that wish to assert their interests in this industry are faced with persecution and labelling of being a grey market, or as having ties with a black market. It is being suggested that what First Nations are developing, despite colonial incursion on their cannabis rights, is the Red Market.
 
Intrigue has been sparked by the determination in approach by Indigenous entrepreneurs, and the impact that First Nations who are not prepared to allow a colonial narrative to be perpetuated are having on the industry . You will also notice, if you look closely, that First Nation cannabis entrepreneurs who are succeeding, are well empowered with expertise, innovative ideas, investment capacity and are sought by non-Indigenous investors because of the edge that Indigenous Nationhood rightfully maintains. Taxation, law-making authority, land, and an Indigenous worldview goes a long way in an industry that is based on a product that is living, comes from the land, and requires organic intelligence.
 
First Nation cannabis is going to flourish – not because colonial laws dictate, but because First Nations are not going to be dictated to by-laws that did not initially consider Indigenous interest.
 
So on this annual commemoration of cannabis culture, remember that it was JacquesCartier’s failing as he set out on April 20, 1534 to find new lands to exploit, to not anticipate a People with pride, dignity, drive, determination, and ability.A People with all those necessary attributes in the business acumen that we are seeing in First Nation cannabis business leaders who are rightfully challenging Canada’s laws today.
 
Isadore Day, Wiindawtegowinini
CEO Bimaadzwin

Bimaadzwin Reaction to Provincial Budget 2019: Ontario and First Nations agree that Federal Transfer Payments are key to creating wealth and the conditions to be open for business

(Serpent River First Nation, April 11, 2019) “Today’s provincial budget – the first by the Doug Ford Conservative government – makes a point that the current system of federal transfers is ‘broken and not working.’ As a former First Nation leader, I sympathize with Finance Minister Vic Fedeli’s concerns. Nationally, First Nations are promised billions of dollars annually in programs and services, but it never seems to reach the communities.”

To quote today’s budget: ‘It is critical that the federal government treat Ontario’s businesses, individuals, and families fairly and support them through adequate transfer agreements, not more red tape and administrative burdens.’

“For First Nations in Ontario – and across Canada – this sounds very familiar – ‘red tape and administrative burdens’.  Just like the provinces and territories, First Nations need to break free of red tape and bureaucracy in Ottawa,” said Day. “At the same time, First Nations should no longer have to sit and wait for federal and provincial budgets to treat our peoples like line items in a budget.

“Just like the Province of Ontario, First Nations need to assert our jurisdictions through long term reliable, sustainable federal fiscal transfers that will go directly to our own authorities, regions, and communities. For example, the British Columbia First Nations Health Authority will receive $4.7 billion in direct federal transfer payments over the next decade, with the Province of BC adding $84 million.  This is First Nation health care delivered by First Nations.

“In 2017, the federal government announced that Indigenous Services Canada will download its funding and services, which includes health, to First Nation authorities and communities, within five years,” noted Day. “We now have a little over 3 years at the least to build capacity in our regions and communities in order to prepare to take control of our own services for our own peoples. This is how we will assert Nationhood.

“In closing, I am disappointed there was no mention of First Nations in today’s budget speech, other than the search for “willing Indigenous partners” to help develop the Ring of Fire minerals in the Far North. I predict that Ontario will have to search long and hard before our Peoples are ready to be open for resource development business. Our priority will always remain protecting the lands and waters for our children — and for all peoples across the country, and around the world.”

Universal Healthcare Coverage for All means Indigenous Wellbeing must be established as a High Priority

World Health Day 2019 is observed worldwide on 7th of April. It is also a day that should remind Canadians that the health care system in Canada continues to be a racialized system that is evidenced in the poor health outcomes of First Nations as opposed to the country’s non-indigenous population.

“The health conditions generally in First Nation communities do not represent equitable health with the rest of Canadians. In fact, there has been a lack of follow-through on Reconciliation as a catalyst to health partnerships,” said Isadore Day, CEO of Bimaadzwin and former Chair of the Chiefs Committee on Health at the Assembly of First Nations.  “This lack of commitment is glaring and is proving to show through in the federal government’s poor funding of critical issues like responding to suicides in First Nations. 

“This is why we at Bimaadzwin are advocates for the World Health Organization’s efforts to raise global awareness on health equity issues such as the importance of health and wellness, and equal access to health care professionals and facilities.” 

“Canada’s 2019 Budget is not indicative of a solutions-based approach toward issues of mental health and addictions – which is unsettling, to say the least,” said Day. “The multi-generational impacts of colonialism, residential schools and a grossly underfunded indigenous healthcare system has certainly exasperated the health conditions of the Indigenous community, only leaving one obvious solution – adequate funding. This flies in the face of what World Health Day represents this year.”

Theme of World Health Day 2019

Just like 2018, the theme of World Health Day 2019 is Universal health coverage, according to the World Health Organisation. WHO sees its key aim to ensure that everyone can obtain the care they need, when they need it, right in the heart of the community. WHO chose “Universal Health Coverage” as the theme for World Health Day 2019. Steps are being taken to achieve Universal health coverage for everyone, everywhere and the slogan is “Health for All”.

Bimaadzwin and our team aim to work with First Nation communities to advance their Nationhood objectives in all sectors, including health governance and community planning. Contact us for information and how to get started on making First Nation Health Transformation a reality.

For more information you can reach Bryan Hendry at: bhendry@bimaadzwin.ca or 613-863-1764

Bimaadzwin Federal Budget Reaction: Nationhood Needs to be Addressed in order to build First Nation Economies and Happy, Healthy Communities

(North Caribou Lake First Nation, March 20, 2019) “The highlight of yesterday’s federal budget is that it will be easier for millennials to buy new homes. However, far too many of the First Nation generation who grew up under the two-decade 2 per cent funding cap will continue to suffer in third world housing conditions,” said Isadore Day, Wiindawtegowinini, CEO of Bimaadzwin. “If the federal government were truly serious about reconciliation, the focus on funding should have been on nation building, housing, and economic development. An extra $4.4 billion over four years on program spending, which includes $100 million for economic development, is not much of an investment.

“First of all, I want to commend the federal government for its continued commitment to eliminate Boil Water Advisories (BWAs) within the next two years. But clean drinking water is just one determinant of health. Like all Canadians take for granted, First Nations need clean drinking water flowing out of taps in homes that are safe to live in,” said Day. “As it stands in 2019, just as it did in 1999, First Nation housing remains in crisis. We need at least $8 billion nationally, which includes $2 billion in Ontario and $3 billion in Manitoba.

“On the same day as the federal budget, there was a headline about a four-month old First Nation baby who died after being taken from its mother in Manitoba. This baby is another victim of an Indian Act system that perpetuates poverty and helplessness. This baby’s mother grew up under a two per cent funding cap that has resulted in at least $25 to $30 billion in lost federal funding. This is the reason why we have children taken from their parents. This is the reason why we have children suffering from lung and skin diseases as a result of living in moldy, cold, overcrowded homes.

“On a positive note, I am currently working in North Caribou Lake First Nation, which just received a national Community Housing Recognition Award for the work being done by Housing Manager Gary Benson and his construction team of community members. This is an example of how leadership and commitment can make a positive difference when there is a focus on addressing the human right to housing.”

In August 2017, Indian And Northern Affairs Canada (INAC) was split into two departments – Indigenous Services and Crown-Indigenous Relations. At the same time, the First Nation and Inuit Health Branch (FNIHB) was absorbed into Indigenous Services. It was also announced that Indigenous Services would be dissolved within 5 years, by 2022, in order to be placed in direct control of First Nation governments.

“We have yet to see how First Nations will take control of our own destinies. In order to truly build our Nations, we need to be our own bureaucrats in order to address our own priorities,” said Day. “In order to assume control of our services and economies, we need to begin now to build capacity in our regional and local systems of government. This means we need the same level of control as provincial and territorial governments.

“True Nationhood will only occur when we have federal budgets in 2022 and beyond that directly transfer so many billions of dollars per year to our own economies and services,” concluded Day. “For the sake of our children, we must act now to build our Nations and control our destinies.”

For more information, please contact Bryan Hendry, Director of Marketing and Communications, at 613-863-1764 or bhendry@bimaadzwin.ca

 

 

 

 

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY #IDW2019 — #BalanceforBetter

The late Grandmother Josephine Mandamin, Water Walker and Angela Trudeau at Anishinabe Ceremonies in Serpent River First Nation, 2017.

”Anishinaabe Kwewag (Indigenous Women), and all women, have the powerful ability to carry life which is born of sacred ancestral birth waters called forth by Nokomis Giizis (Grandmother Moon) after nine months. This process has taken place since time immemorial and reflects the sacred harmony of carrying/caring for the force we call “Life”.

It is therefore a woman’s responsibility to honour and care for Nibi (Water), the source of all life, for the next seven generations.” 

Grandmother Josephine Mandamin

BIMAADZWIN, AN INDIGENOUS-LED CONSULTING NEW-CO, CELEBRATES THE DIVERSITY OF THE WOMEN WHO MAKE UP THE MAJORITY OF TEAM LEADERS IN THEIR FIRM!

International Day of Women is a wonderful moment to celebrate and acknowledge the accomplishments of women in Canada generally, and those of Indigenous women specifically. When equal attention and power are given to diverse voices in public life, professional capacities and our personal relationships, everyone benefits and society is stronger.

These are the faces of the women of BIMAADZWIN– all strong, confident and accomplished women in their own right who support their communities, their families and who choose to work in the business landscape to cultivate successful business relationship that forge stronger Indigenous communities through “Affirmative Action”– an active effort to improve the employment or educational opportunities of members of minority groups, women and to create Gender equality. 

It’s thanks to business leaders like Annette Vernschuren, a Canadian Entrepreneur, and former CEO of Home Depot Canada who demonstrated  to women around the world that they could breakthrough the glass ceiling to lead in a male dominated boardroom and to  women like Jody Wilson-Raybould,  an Indigenous leader and former Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada, who were able to speak their truth and strive for excellence despite naysayers.  It’s women like these who help to give voice and encouragement for women to follow in leadership roles. The diverse and knowledgeable team of Women at BIMAADZWIN are reminiscent of these strong women blazing a trail for gender equity for all peoples.

“I don’t spend a lot of time thinking about a legacy, but I have always loved teaching, watching people achieve and become happier because of it.” Annette Verschuren.

What is unique about working in this new Indigenous-Led Consulting firm is that more than 60% of the team are women and the work is performed virtually– allowing the team to have more work life balance. These women come from a wide range of professions including Law, Environmental Studies, International Development and Business Administration and have earned a masters in their respective fields of study. They come from different ethnic backgrounds and work collaboratively to support the growth and prosperity of Indigenous communities across Canada.

BIMAADZWIN , is a young company that is growing daily. It encourages and supports the empowerment of women— professionals wanting to make a difference in their communities and in society. This is done through transformational leadership that creates an interconnected and integrated team environment—the bonus is that this cutting-edge company offers a shared virtual work space that encourages Indigenous development and innovation. This of course wouldn’t be possible without the Core Values shared at BIMAADZWIN, they are; Highest Order of Inherent Right, Cultural Reciprocity, Environmental Consciousness, Shared Mentorship, Family, Professional Agility/Innovativeness and Accountability and Transparency – that has created an environment of work-life balance for all team members.

Today we celebrate diversity, gender equality and salute all Women for the hard work and tenacity to move the goal post even further– a collective and individual responsibility of every person in this country is to celebrate women in their accomplishments and also to support women in the continued efforts towards equality.

For more information about BIMAADZWIN, our services and associates, please contact, Isadore Day, CEO and President by email at Iday@bimaadzwin.ca or by mail at P.O. Box 192 – 511 Highway 17E Serpent River First Nation Cutler, ON POP 1 B0

Messages from the women of BIMAADZWIN

Charu Murti, Organization Development Coordinator

I am where I am today because of being a woman.

From the experience of giving life. To the many layers of relational accountability.

From being a mother, wife, daughter, sister, aunt, friend. To the studying, working and volunteering for decades.

Heart and mind were ready ten years ago to learn and work on what needs to be done as a newcomer on this land.

Heart and mind were ready to see how we needed to protect the children of this land.

Here’s celebrating today the center of the circle of life – the Indigenous woman.

May we learn from her on how to protect and uphold all that is sacred. Whether it is land or water. Whether it is human or non-human living beings.

May we protect and uphold the Indigenous woman, today and always!

Sarah Yankoo, Director of Planning and Technical Sevices

“When we begin to understand the colonial legacy and its collateral damage to the minds and bodies of Indigenous women, we can begin to forgive, accept, and heal ourselves from the countless hurtful, damaging ways in which this trauma manifests itself. When we embrace our long-standing inner memory of the richness of our teachings, in those moments we reclaim and honor our ancestors’ truth, courage, and resilience.” – Nahanni Fontaine (Anishinaabe), in #NotYourPrincess: Voices of Native American Women by Lisa Charleyboy

I was raised in the wake of my mother’s reconnection to the Algonquin Nation. Separated from her family in the 60s Scoop, my mother met her three sisters, her Aunties, her community and her culture as I grew alongside her. As the Truth portion of Reconciliation manifests, many are learning about the traumatic histories we have endured for the first time. So much of this illumination will be led and supported by Indigenous women, two-spirit and non-binary people.

While this day celebrates and recognizes women, as a two-spirit woman, I feel it is dually important to recognize two-spirit and non-binary identities:

“I am a Two Spirit, the third strand in a thick braid, and my identity is weaved in between the male and the female, the community and academia, the traditional and the modern, the spirit and the flesh. Being Queer and Indigenous we stand at the crossroads of culture and the intersection of identity” – Damien Paul Montano, Kimiwan Zine: sikwan 2014

As a spirit woven between many dualities, I honor the balance and vision of all the feminine energies I have had the privilege of encountering in this life.

Nikki Bakes, Director of Operations

I often admire the trail blazed by talented and dedicated Indigenous women in this country. Examples of Indigenous women excelling in their occupations and communities abound, regardless of whether they are poets, lawyers, artists, doctors, teachers, or politicians.  One example of an accomplished Indigenous woman who has strengthened Canadian society by using her voice is Dr. Cindy Blackstock. Dr. Blackstock is a professor of Social Work at McGill University, Executive Director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society (FNCFCS), and a member of Gitxsan First Nation. 

Dr. Blackstock is a prominent advocate for Indigenous children. She has worked for more than 30 years aiming for First Nations children and families to be treated equal to other Canadian kids and moms. Dr. Blackstock has laboured to have the government implement Jordan’s Principle, a child-first health-care funding process and to ensure First Nations children on-reserve receive equal treatment and funding as those off-reserve. “I am always just stunned that I have to be an activist to get equity for little kids,” she said. 

For me, Dr. Cindy Blackstock is an inspiration and an example of what International Women’s Day celebrates. She is one of many determined Indigenous women leaders whose tireless work ethic, steadfast integrity, and courageous conviction in speaking truth to power is an example to others for how to live by one’s values in pursuit of justice and equality.

We each have an opportunity to make Canada a better place for all women and girls by implementing Jordan’s Principle and ensuring funding in health care and child welfare is equitable for Indigenous kids. When Indigenous women and children are treated equally, Canadian society is stronger.

Allison Deer, Senior Projects Advisor

Today we celebrate the International Day of Women #IDW, which has me reflecting on what’s changed from the days of suffragette in Canada (1917) and the feminist movement (1960’s) and, more specifically, the impact on the corporate world.  While the feminist movement inched women along the road to equality, greater representation, and better pay equity, women in subsequent years continued to strive for parity with their male counterparts; hence the pursuit of gender equality is still alive and well, but I think we are getting better at this determination which is evident on today’s—day of celebration!  

Women today have successful role models,  are better educated, and have access to wealth and better health care.  All of which contribute to the ever-growing number of women, whose faces, stories, and experiences now share the spot light in Forbes, the Economist, Time Magazine and other renowned business periodicals.  

There is hope for future generations of female leaders.  With more female role models, greater access to education and a particular style of female leadership, being more transformational in nature, perhaps the time is ripe for women to lead nations and the business world, especially, during these challenging times. There is no doubt that role-models and mentorship greatly influence and encourage more women to advance and take their rightful place in the corporate world.  Still, corporations require a blend of both female and male leaders and more importantly, a blend of leadership styles that can greater contribute to gender parity.   We have come a long way, but we still have a long way to go.   Let’s continue to strive for better equality and continue this narrative. #BalanceforBetter

At BIMAADZWIN, the team is surrounded by talented, confident and professionals of women who lead by example, this is not surprising since its CEO and founder, encourages balanced leadership, team interdependence and interconnectivity, devolving future goals, and embraces innovation to attain our organizational goals;  #balanceforbetter is the goal. We are moving in the right direction!

Angela Trudeau, Cultural Coordinator and Administrative Suport

Recognition and empowerment of women today makes stronger families, communities and nations. International Women’s Day celebrates the achievements of women globally, while also raising awareness for the continued need of collective action for a gender balanced world. Although, inequity of women continues to be a global issue, more and more women and girls are rising to prominence, taking their place on the world stage of influence.  

At Bimaadzwin, the diverse influence of its women is revered and vital. It embraces an Indigenous value of balance. Inclusiveness, gender balance and shared leadership are values at the foundation of Bimaadzwin’s success. I unequivocally believe, if the world would embrace women equally, the world would be in a much better place than it is today. It’s all about creating a better world for our girls so that they don’t struggle with inequity issues the way our grandmothers, mothers and we have. And when they are women, it is my dream the equality gap will have been closed for them to thrive as world leaders.

Photos of the women of BIMAADZWIN

IWD2019 Reading List

Stolen Sisters: The story of two missing girls, their families and how Canada has failed Indigenous women
The Right To Be Cold: One Woman's Story of Protecting Her Culture, the Arctic and the Whole Planet
Birdie
A Two-Spirit Journey: The Autobiography of a Lesbian Ojibwa-Cree Elder
Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City
Strong Women Stories: Native Vision and Community Survival
Sovereign Erotics: A Collection of Two-Spirit Literature
Nationhood Interrupted: Revitalizing nêhiyaw Legal Systems
Indigenous Writes: A Guide to First Nations, Métis, and Inuit Issues in Canada
Every Day Is a Good Day: Reflections by Contemporary Indigenous Women
Mean Spirit
Split Tooth
Half-Breed
April Raintree
I Am Woman: A Native Perspective on Sociology and Feminism
Secret Path
#Indianlovepoems
Beyond Blood: Rethinking Indigenous Identity
The Break
A Recognition Of Being: Reconstructing Native Womanhood


Bimaadzwin's favorite books »

Do Not Lose Sight of Health Services for our Most Vulnerable

OTTAWA – POLITICS – This past Tuesday, the provincial government announced that it will create a “super” agency called Ontario Health that will eventually dissolve the 14 Local Health Integration Networks (LIHNs), and six other agencies which include Cancer Care Ontario and eHealth Ontario. The North West LIHN covers half of the province’s land mass and serves a mostly First Nation population.

Originally posted in the NetNewsLedger. Read More

Sovereignty, Indigenous partnerships, licencing were main themes of 2nd National Indigenous Cannabis and Hemp Conference (NICHC) held this week in Ottawa

(Ottawa, February 22, 2019) For the first time ever, two federal ministers spoke at a cannabis conference – Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor and Border Securities Minister Bill Blair, who is in charge of Canada’s Cannabis Act. Both Ministers made encouraging statements yesterday on the need to further include Indigenous peoples in the hemp and cannabis industry.

“We are supporting Indigenous communities who want to have a role in the cannabis landscape,” said Minister Petipas Taylor, who pointed out that Canada’s legalization and regulation of cannabis presents an historic opportunity to do things better. “Our government respects Indigenous peoples needs, desires and perspectives.”

Minister Blair pointed out that Indigenous Services Canada has recently modernized its economic development policies in order to address participation in the cannabis industry. “Our government recognizes the important link between economic development and improved outcomes in health and social development. The Cannabis Act provides an open and fair licencing process.”

When asked by a delegate if the government would respect the Algonquin sovereign right to produce and sell cannabis in the territory that includes Ottawa, Minister Blair replied: “We acknowledge and respect the jurisdiction of First Nations. There is an important nation to nation discussion on how both of our jurisdictions are recognized, especially in the health and safety of our peoples.”

Isadore Day, Wiindawtegowinini, CEO of Bimaadzwin, who chaired the conference, said there is a multi-billion-dollar potential for partnerships among the 300 delegates, exhibitors and fledgling Indigenous companies/retailers who were present. “That mainstream cannabis train is going to keep on going. Let’s jump on our own track, under our own steam. At the same time, we need to build trust with governments and the Canadian public. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for all our Nations to partner and participate in this growing industry.”

Kahnawake Grand Chief Joseph Tokwiro Norton stressed that his community is developing its own cannabis law in order to ensure public health and safety and access to a population of three million in the Montreal area. “We are already a major contributor to the economy. We employ a lot of people. We need to educate the provincial and federal governments on what we do. We’re going to take advantage of our location. If cannabis is one product that’s going to be in demand, then let’s do it.”

Opaskwayak Cree Nation Onekanew Christian Sinclair brought his remote Manitoba community out of debt by investing and partnering in cannabis production and retail companies in Canada and California. “Because of the current cannabis shortage for years to come, this is a golden opportunity for all First Nations to get into the game.”

Bimaadzwin continues to work towards clarifying and setting out challenging policy discussions. These challenges are being identified by working with Indigenous cannabis entrepreneurs, communities, and leaders within First Nation, federal, and provincial jurisdictions in regard to participation in the hemp and cannabis economy.

For more information, please contact:

Bryan Hendry, Director of Marketing and Communications, bhendry@bimaadzwin.ca or 613-863-1764

All photos by Fred Cattroll

Indigenous Cannabis Consortium to be launched at National Indigenous Cannabis and Hemp Conference

“Now is the Time for First Nations and Indigenous Peoples to Secure Their Position in the Global Cannabis Market”

 

Serpent River, Ontario, Jan. 31, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — “The second National Indigenous Cannabis and Hemp Conference (NICHC) to be held in Ottawa, February 19-21, represents a significant opportunity for First Nations and Indigenous peoples to secure a significant competitive position in the national and global cannabis and hemp markets,” said Isadore Day, CEO of Bimaadzwin, and publisher of Growth and Prosperity Magazine at https://bimaadzwin.ca/magazine/

“The first NICHC brought together  a national consortium and working group that is focused on supporting those Indigenous entrepreneurs and communities who want to participate in the cannabis market,” said Mr. Day. “There are a number of questions and concerns on policy, process, and participation that we need answered at next month’s conference.”

Key Open Questions Include:

Indigenous communities must be able to fully participate in Canada’s cannabis industry and the global market – from seed to sale – in a manner that respects our sovereignty, community by-laws and global commercial reality. When will the government provide clarity on critical issues?

Indigenous communities want to have the ability to sell cannabis products to their own members, the Canadian public, and also export internationally. How do we as First Nation companies establish ourselves to compete across all markets? If cannabis products are tested and meet current Health Canada standards, will there be any other federal/provincial barriers to full commercial participation?

How can Indigenous communities access federal health and education funding to understand and communicate cannabis health risks and benefits, especially to inform and protect our youth and to support our harm reduction challenges? We have specific concerns about edibles and derivative products as they aren’t well understood or tested but are soon expected to come to the market.  

“We know that Wiisag,  a First Nation cannabis company, and one of the invited participants,  deals with these types of questions every day. We have heard that they have been working out these questions with every community and entrepreneur they have been forming alliances and partnerships with,” added Mr. Day.

“We are extremely excited to have Wiisag participate in the second National Indigenous Cannabis and Hemp Conference.  They seem to stir up much excitement among the participants with their vision of a national and international Indigenous brand,” said conference organizer Howard Silver.

“Wiisag is looking forward to another great experience and thanks the tremendous efforts of Bimaadzwin and the conference organizers for extending Wiisag the opportunity to participate and engage with all of the conferecnce participants.  We wish everyone safe travels,“ said Jake Linklater, Executive Chairman of Wiisag.

The conference opens with a reception at the Ottawa Shaw Centre on the evening of February 19th, sponsored by Bimaadzwin, Wiisag, and the Capital Hill Group. Parliamentarians have been invited to attend. Health Minister Ginette Petitpas Taylor is one of many conference speakers. For details on the 2nd National Indigenous Cannabis and Hemp Conference, please visit: www.nichc.ca

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Bryan Hendry
Bimaadzwin
6138631764
bhendry@bimaadzwin.ca