Edition No. 5 — COVID-19 Information for First Nation and Indigenous Communities

To:                        First Nations and Indigenous Communities

From:                  Isadore Day, CEO – Bimaadzwin Inc

 Date:                    Thursday, April 23, 2020

 Re:                         COVID19 Weekly Publication – Issue #005

Welcome to the edition number 5 of our weekly COVID-19 Bulletin for First Nations and Indigenous peoples. Every week, Bimaadzwin will post information that contains basic information, the latest news, and what governments are doing to address the current pandemic.

This morning we have been informed that Gull Bay First Nation has six confirmed cases of COVID-19 and that there may be more. Bimaadzwin has already connected Gull Bay with www.conquercovid19.ca who will supply donated masks and sanitizer that are much needed in the community. This is a stark reminder that people must continue to self isolate and disinfect when they do have to leave their homes.

The simplest message is: “Stay at home.” We are all in this together. Everyone must stay informed in order stay safe. That is our central goal and commitment for this publication. Please click on the link below for this week’s presentation:

https://issuu.com/bimaadzwin/docs/covid-fnno.5_04.23_

Please sign the petition below to urge the federal government to provide the necessary funding and resources so First Nation and Indigenous communities are fully equipped to combat COVID-19:

https://www.change.org/p/prime-minister-trudeau-more-resources-for-covid-19-for-indigenous-communities-urgently-needed?recruiter=945662399&recruited_by_id=e3681c10-501f-11e9-83a6-7bf1b129e0b4

We look forward to your feedback, ideas, and shared information that we can help send across to First Nations across Turtle Island. We are working with various partners to ensure that the information that is being conveyed is support of First Nations as they activate Pandemic Plans and work toward reconstituting First Nation communities once the transmission of COVID19 is no longer a threat to human health.

Please contact us at hpelky@bimaadzwin.ca / 1-705-987-2505. Working together, we can, and will make it through this and be stronger as Indigenous People, families, communities, and nations.

In Health, Healing and Nationhood,

Isadore Day, Wiindawtegowinini

CEO Bimaadzwin Inc

Fourth Edition: COVID-19 Bulletin for First Nations and Indigenous Peoples

Welcome to the fourth edition of our weekly COVID-19 Bulletin for First Nations and Indigenous peoples.  Every week, Bimaadzwin will post information that contains basic information, the latest news, and what governments are doing to address the current pandemic. We believe any information is critical and needed.

Canadians are beginning to realize that Indigenous peoples are once again receiving far less funding and support to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. The $215 million in funding for 633 First Nation communities, which is further delayed by having to submit applications to the federal government, amounts to less than one per cent of the $82 billion that has been allocated for mainstream Canadians.

There are now a growing number of COVID-19 cases in First Nation and Inuit communities – over 40 as of April 15th. Many of these communities do not have the medical supports in place to treat the victims and protect those who are healthy.

As a result, there is an online petition requesting that the federal government immediately provide the necessary funds and supports for all Indigenous communities. You can sign the petition at this link:

https://www.change.org/p/prime-minister-trudeau-more-resources-for-covid-19-for-indigenous-communities-urgently-needed?recruiter=945662399&recruited_by_id=e3681c10-501f-11e9-83a6-7bf1b129e0b4

The simplest message is: “Stay at home.” We are all in this together. Everyone must stay informed in order stay safe. That is our central goal and commitment for this publication. Please click on the link below for this week’s presentation:

https://issuu.com/bimaadzwin/docs/covid-fn_issue_no.4__04.16_

We look forward to your feedback, ideas, and shared information that we can help send across to First Nations across Turtle Island.

Please contact us at hpelky@bimaadzwin.ca / 1-705-987-2505. Working together, we can, and will make it through this and be stronger as Indigenous People, families, communities, and nations.

In Health, Healing and Nationhood,

Isadore Day, Wiindawtegowinini CEO Bimaadzwin Inc

COVID Stay Home Message

Third Edition of COVID-19 Information for First Nations — April 7

First Nations and Indigenous Communities

 From:                  Isadore Day, CEO – Bimaadzwin Inc

 Date:                    Thursday, April 9 2020

 Re:                         COVID19 Weekly Publication – Edition #3

COVID-19 has increasingly become the most critical health emergency for First Nations in modern time. In this edition, we are reporting that there are increased infections in our communities, across certain regions in the country, with one recent fatality.

The current pandemic plans in First Nations are in large part developed, although there appear to be several dozen in Ontario alone with no plans at the present. Communities have either government-templated plans or plans being developed by the First Nation and their health teams.

“Stay at home.” We are all in this together.  Everyone must stay informed in order stay safe.  That remains our central goal and commitment as we expedite this publication.

Please click the link for this week’s publication:

https://issuu.com/bimaadzwin/docs/covid-fnno.3_04.09__980ea1ebb198ec

We look forward to your feedback, ideas, and shared information that we can help send across to First Nations across Turtle Island.

We are working with various partners to ensure that the information being conveyed is in support of First Nations as they activate Pandemic Plans and work toward reconstituting First Nation communities once the transmission of COVID19 is no longer a threat to human health.

Implementing strategies, business continuity, and re-focusing efforts to meet the needs of our local First Nation communities is the focus of our efforts. We look forward to this publication evolving based on your specific approaches and will open up dialogue in next week’s issue.

Please contact us at hpelky@bimaadzwin.ca / 1-705-987-2505. Working together, we can, and will make it through this and be stronger as Indigenous People, families, communities, and Nations.

 In Health, Healing and Nationhood,

Isadore Day, Wiindawtegowinini

CEO Bimaadzwin Inc

Second Edition of COVID-19 Bulletin for First Nations and Indigenous Peoples

First Nations and Indigenous Communities

 From:                  Isadore Day, CEO – Bimaadzwin Inc

 Date:                    Thursday, April 2, 2020

 Re:                         COVID19 Weekly Publication – Issue #002

 

Welcome to the second edition of our weekly COVID-19 Bulletin for First Nations and Indigenous peoples.  Every week, Bimaadzwin will post information that contains basic information, the latest news, and what governments are doing to address the current pandemic. We believe any information is critical and needed.

We want to point out that Indigenous peoples have only been allocated $305 million by the federal government in order to address this pandemic. First Nations will only receive $215 million which is a small fraction of what is being allocated for mainstream Canadians. This amounts to less than one per cent of the $82 billion that has been allocated for mainstream Canadians. Again, this is the reason why we want to get this information into our communities on a weekly basis.

The simplest message is: “Stay at home.” We are all in this together. Everyone must stay informed in order stay safe. That is our central goal and commitment for this publication. Please click on the link below for this week’s presentation:

https://issuu.com/bimaadzwin/docs/final_issue_2_covid-fn_04.02_.pptx

We look forward to your feedback, ideas, and shared information that we can help send across to First Nations across Turtle Island. We are working with various partners to ensure that the information that is being conveyed is support of First Nations as they activate Pandemic Plans and work toward reconstituting First Nation communities once the transmission of COVID19 is no longer a threat to human health.

Implementing strategies, business continuity, and re-focusing efforts to meet the needs of our local First Nation communities is the focus of our efforts. We look forward to this publication evolving based on what you want to hear each week.

Please contact us at hpelky@bimaadzwin.ca / 1-705-987-2505. Working together, we can, and will make it through this and be stronger as Indigenous People, families, communities, and nations.

In Health, Healing and Nationhood,

Isadore Day, Wiindawtegowinini

CEO Bimaadzwin Inc

 

COVID-19 Information for First Nations — First Issue March 27, 2020

In these unprecedented and uncertain times, First Nations, and all Indigenous peoples, need accurate information on COVID-19. Every week, Bimaadzwin will post information that contains basic information, the latest news, and what governments are doing to address the current pandemic.

The simplest message is: “Stay at home.” We are all in this together. Everyone must stay informed in order stay safe. That is our central goal and commitment as we expedite this publication. Please click on the link below for this week’s presentation:

We look forward to your feedback, ideas, and shared information that we can help send across to First Nations across Turtle Island.

We are working with various partners to ensure that the information that is being conveyed is support of First Nations as they activate Pandemic Plans and work toward reconstituting First Nation communities once the transmission of COVID19 is no longer a threat to human health.

Implementing strategies, business continuity, and re-focusing efforts to meet the needs of our local First Nation communities is the focus of our efforts. We look forward to this publication evolving based on your specific approaches and will open up dialogue in next week’s issue.

Please contact us at hpelky@bimaadzwin.ca / 1-705-987-2505. Working together, we can, and will make it through this and be stronger as Indigenous People, families, communities, and nations.

In Health, Healing and Nationhood,

Isadore Day, Wiindawtegowinini CEO Bimaadzwin Inc

International Women’s Day 2020: Indigenous Women Will Revitalize and Rebuild Our Nations

By Isadore Day, CEO Bimaadzwin

(March 7, 2020) On Thursday in Kahnawake, warrior women stood by a pink Mohawk flag to announce that the railroad blockade was being dismantled. This was a powerful image that reinforces the increasing leadership role that Indigenous women are asserting in this country. Indigenous women are not only water protectors and land defenders, they are leaders for revitalizing our Nations.

This Sunday is International Women’s Day, the one day per year set aside to celebrate the accomplishments of women. More specifically, the day marks efforts at ending discrimination against women and highlights the need for full participation as equals to men.  At Bimaadzwin, we believe that women have — and will — become the driving force to rebuilding our Nations.

Before contact with European settlers, our Peoples respected and heeded the counsel and guidance of matriarchal leaders. The Indian Act ushered in male-dominated colonial band systems, which not only undermined the traditional authority of women, but created a dysfunctional societal relationship which has led to discrimination, domestic violence, and Missing and Murdered Women and Girls.

It will take at least another generation before all our Peoples, and our Nations, will be equal in sovereign and economic power with colonial governments and settler society. In the meantime, we must continue to encourage Indigenous women – and girls – to reclaim their rightful place as true leaders. We need warrior women to lead the way to full sovereignty for our Peoples.

Below are quotes from our Bimaadzwin female staff:

“This year, more than ever, we’ve seen Indigenous Women in the frontlines protecting, protesting and standing up for Indigenous Rights across what we call Turtle Island (AKA North America). The women and our young women are standing up to protect our lands, water, nations, languages, our governing structures and inherent rights for future generations and for the faces unborn.  Indigenous peoples of Turtle Island, for the most part, are matrilineal and matriarchal societies and have always had a voice in our traditional longhouses.  It is our women through their clans who govern the actions of the Land Defenders in terms of internal and external affairs. It has always been this way.

Still, for the first time in a very long-time indigenous people including indigenous urban communities, band councils, local traditional police enforcements, and longhouse people, united as one voice to support our brothers and sisters the  Wet’suwetén peoples who faced an unlawful  invasion into their territory.

“I am proud of our Kanien’keha:ka Nation women and men who acted as one to this infringement of our inherent land rights, and our rights to a good quality of life.  This was a true demonstration of #eachforequal.  A practice used from time and memorial in indigenous democratic confederacies—that’s what I call decolonized action for all.  We are not war like peoples we are righteous, peaceful, true democratic peoples in which women play an equal and very important role in our governance structures.   The Land Defenders demonstrated equality and justice for all very clearly over the past month. I am proud of our Hereditary Chiefs and Clan Mothers, who play an equal role in our governing structures, they have protected and served our peoples well—Peace, power and righteousness, through equality!”

–Allison Deer

“Today on International Women’s Day we celebrate women everywhere. As mothers, we have the great honour and obligation to help our daughters to become the best that they can be and to do the best that they can to use their strength as women, to contribute strength back into our Indigenous communities and our respective Nations. A very strong message coming from so many of our women knowledge keepers and matriarchs, is to always lift our daughters up, helping them to reach their goals and to celebrate with them. Our nations become stronger when we lift them up; their voice is our voice, their strength makes the world a better place.”

–Angela Day

“Women’s equality in our economy and parity in government all over the world will send a strong message that our women are moving forward to make a difference for our children today, tomorrow and the future.  Our society needs to be more supportive and champion our women.   Let’s take care of Mother Earth and be one voice in making a difference.”

–Heather Pelky

“As a non-Indigenous woman living on the land that is now called Canada, I like to uphold ‘IWD’ more as an Indigenous Women’s Day. As I watch the Indigenous women from coast to coast to coast assert their inherent rights, I am struck by how much they do to protect what is good for the climate, the land, the water, the community, the traditions, the languages and, most of all, the families. They are often the ones in the frontlines shouldering struggles on behalf of all of us. On this day, let us commit to support them and their work EVERY day.”

–Charu Murti

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Power Point: First Nation Federal Cannabis Framework Update at CANDO Conference

(October 30, Gatineau, QC) Isadore Day presented an update at the 26th Annual CANDO Conference on the progress being made in regard to the First Nation Federal Cannabis Framework.  There were over 300 Indigenous Economic Development Officers in attendance at the Lac Leamy Hilton.

“Right now, 80 per cent of cannabis purchased by Canadians is from the black market. Mainstream cannabis producers and dispensaries are losing money,” said Day. “The challenge that First Nations face is to legally fill that gap. We must be able to cultivate, process, and retail cannabis that is entirely legal and legitimate in the eyes of the federal and provincial governments.”

The full power point presentation is posted below:

FINAL 19-10-30 CANDO Cannabis Panel

 

Growth and Prosperity Fall-Winter 2019/2020 Launched

Isadore Day on 10-17: One Year After Legalization First Nations are Still Trying to Figure out the Pros and Cons of Health, Safety and Economic Benefits of Cannabis     

(Serpent River, October 17, 2019) Today, October 17th, 2019 marks the one-year anniversary of the legalization of cannabis in Canada. This is an appropriate day to launch the third edition of Growth and Prosperity: Indigenous Hemp and Cannabis Magazine. The feature story is on the work being done with the federal government to include First Nations in the mainstream cannabis industry from seed to sale.

What we have learned so far is Indigenous Peoples were not included by the federal government– and were not adequately informed — about the pros and cons of this new industry. What we have learned so far is that the federal government is now willing to work with our Peoples on all fronts – from health and safety education and supports to ensuring inclusion in the mainstream industry though a harmonized framework approach.

One year after legalization, at least 80 per cent of the cannabis consumed in Canada is from the black market. There is still much misinformation about cannabis as a disruptive gateway drug to serious addiction. There is misinformation that a First Nation community that gets involved in growing or selling cannabis will be a target for organized crime and will endanger the lives of their children.

The reality is that alcohol and tobacco have proven to be far more dangerous when overconsumed. Organized crime is far more involved in the illicit alcohol and tobacco trade in our communities.  The answer to this cannabis misinformation is education.

Our leadership, and our citizens, must take the time to consider whether First Nation participation in the cannabis industry is something that they want to pursue as a means of long-term economic opportunity. At the same time, those communities with high rates of drug and alcohol abuse may want to examine medicinal cannabis as a safer means of recovery from addiction.

I am inspired by Dr. Shelley Turner’s medical clinic – Ekosi Health. “Ekosi” is Cree word that means “this is good, this is the way forward.” She has become an expert on the many benefits of medicinal cannabis. Her practice focuses on education, data, and science – knowledge and safe access to cannabis.

What we do know about cannabis is that it’s a natural plant that as been consumed for thousands of years. It’s only been within the past several decades that science has separated different strains that have different effects upon the human body. Cannabis with THC is a mind-altering substance. Cannabis with CBD is the medicinal, healing, and calming substance.

The simple plan for those communities who want to explore both the economic and well-being potential of cannabis is to first concentrate on medicinal cannabis. For example, Seven Leaf in Akwesasne, is a Health Canada licenced producer of medicinal cannabis. They now employ over 50 local Mohawk residents.

Not only is Seven Leaf contributing to the economic well-being of those 50 families, they are producing a safe product that has the power to heal. If your grandmother is in severe pain with arthritis, or if your dog has anxiety when there’s a thunderstorm, why not use medicinal cannabis?

Cannabis has the power to heal our Peoples and it has the power to create wealth for our Peoples.

Ekosi: This is good, this is the way forward.

Growth & Prosperity Issue3 Fall-Winter 2019-20